How were the lives of women on the home front affected by the first world war

Share via Email A sign chalked on the front of a shop in the east end of London assures people in that the business is Russian-owned. For men, women, and children confined to the home front between andexhilarating surges of patriotic energies and the evaporation of many restraints were fleeting thrills when set against the loss of loved ones. Children woke to find that their fathers had left for distant battlefields while they slept.

How were the lives of women on the home front affected by the first world war

Hire Writer Therefore showing that women were abandoning their responsibilities or rather the responsibility society had appointed to them. The jobs were not the only things that kept women motivated and grateful in their new fields of work. The pay did to. This is evident for the progress women made during World War One, and because Mrs Felstead wrote of her own experiences, it makes this source quite reliable, especially as it is from the records of the Imperial War Museum.

This further outlines the economical progress women have made. In in a speech by the former prime minister, H. Before the war he was divergent to it.

Home front during World War II - Wikipedia

Women shifting his mind and achieving this was a major breakthrough for them politically. And this political change is significant because it meant women could vote and in turn let their voices be heard.

The source is very useful in helping us to understand why some men were convinced by the contribution of women during the war that they deserved the vote. This shows how working class women benefited economically from the war.

Within this transition, women also faced many problems and challenges.

Latest Features

This primary source, 15, was written to persuade woman to give up their jobs for the men to take back. This source is a clear example of the constant criticism women faced, and although it is anonymous and could be the view of the minority, it does fit with the widespread view in the media at the time; that women were selfish if they did not return to their homes or domestic services.

The difference in the names represents the difference in the attitudes of men and the media. Additionally, this source is useful in that it illustrates the titles and respect for women that were so quick to change.

Collections Search

This source is reliable as it was recorded around the time of the incident. It is useful in that it shows us an example of some of the mistreatment women suffered in doing what they felt was right for them and future generations.

Another sacrifice that woman took was in keeping their jobs, while not even enjoying it. The only thing that kept them going was the higher wages, claims Sylvia Pankhurst; whose mother was a suffragette and father was a lawyer. This source represents the massive amount of desperation as well as devotion from the working class women.

It also shows a change in motives, women were no longer doing this for their men at war, but for themselves; surely they urgently needed the money enough to have suffocated themselves. To conclude, whether it meant; the right to vote, working in industrial areas or being allowed out without a chaperon, the First World War had affected the lives of women, especially working class women in many ways in the home front.

They were able to see through the problems and challenges while it went from scarcity of jobs and low pay, to abundances of jobs and higher pay. Women had started to be seen as equal. This is evident now since, the type of jobs afforded to men, is equally given to a woman. Women nowadays leave the home front to join the army at war.

In some cases women such as, Margaret Thatcher have reached the very top and become prime ministers. How to cite this page Choose cite format:Instead, we want to broaden our understanding to include the women whose lives were affected by the military and the war: women who were left on the home front, women who saw their husbands and sons go off to fight, women in Europe who experienced the war firsthand as it ravaged their hometowns, and even the women in media and art who.

One of the biggest improvements in the lives of women during the First World War was in the area of health. Women lived longer and healthier lives after the war and lost fewer children in infancy.

During and after the war infant mortality was reduced by two thirds.

How were the lives of women on the home front affected by the first world war

How were the lives of women on the Home Front affected by the First World War? Did World War One actually improve women's lives in Britain? Before WW1 women were not expected to of the first recruits to the London General Omnibus Company in were former domestic servants (cleaners/nannies) and the number of women in the Civil Service.

Women's lives changed in many ways during World War II. As with most wars, many women found their roles and opportunities—and responsibilities—expanded.

How were the lives of women on the home front affected by the first world war

As Doris Weatherford wrote, “War holds many ironies, and among them is its liberating effect on women.” But the war also results in the. Mar 10,  · During World War II, some , women served in the U.S.

How were the lives of women on the Home Front affected by the First World War

Armed Forces, both at home and abroad. They included the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots, who on March 10, , were awarded the. To conclude, whether it meant; the right to vote, working in industrial areas or being allowed out without a chaperon, the First World War had affected the lives of women, especially working class women in many ways in the home front.

BBC iWonder - What did World War One really do for women?